mal’s Weblog











{February 20, 2013}   categorizing social media platforms
striking that balance is as much on you as on others' perception of you (photo credits: google images)

striking that balance is as much on you as on others’ perception of you (photo credits: google images)

As a Marketing and HR bi-major (MBA from one of the top business schools in my region) and professional, it irks me to no end when potential employers or line managers scan your personal social media profiles to arrive at a judgement of your work-related potential. Common examples are pictures uploaded on facebook where you might be acting silly with your friends, and a potential or current employer, boss, or colleague takes that to mean you have a non-serious attitude that applies everywhere and anywhere, and makes sure to have it noticed in the work place environment. Another common example is the need for people to mention in their twitter bio data something along the lines of “RT’s are not endorsements,” or “Views my own, not my employer’s”.

However, given the kind of background we all come from in Pakistan, a background where people are only beginning to understand and practice professional HR standards and practices, I believe those who face such problems are also at a bit of fault.

where to draw the line (image source: google images)

where to draw the line (image source: google images)

For instance, a simple measure that could be taken is to avoid mentioning you work related background on a twitter account that you are using solely for entertainment, or, for instance, ensuring that colleagues are kept off your facebook profile. One of my colleague-cum-bosses I worked with went so far as to make 2 facebook profiles, one was strictly personal, and the other to keep in touch with professional contacts as per facebook’s ways. Like, why should you mention where you work or what professional background you hold, on a twitter bio, when you know that the purpose of that account is more personal (such as RT-ing jokes & quips, most of which may not be acceptable in a professional setting) than corporate? 

You have LinkedIn for professional contacts and communication, apart from your professional email address, office number etc. Must you have all your professional contacts on all your personal interaction forums?

Simple rule: decide what the objective of your social profile is, for each social platform: Do you want your facebook profile to be the primary manner in which to keep in touch with professional contacts or seek out professional opportunities? Do you want people not to confuse your twitter account with what your employer or your work ethics represent? Do you want to restrict professional activity to LinkedIn only? How would you prefer people contacting you for work – via personal email ID or via a professional one?

find that balance & stick to it - message is consistency & updation (image credit: google images)

find that balance & stick to it – message is consistency & updation (image credit: google images)

Even if you use more than one social platforms for several purposes each, in the end, it all boils down to the weightage you give to each objective on each profile. That, and strict adherence to your own rules, will help you fend off professional attacks due to activity on personal profiles/accounts.

Advertisements


Why lead multiple personalities — if someone is judging you for your personal life, then that person is a creep, and you shouldn’t be working with him/her in the first place. Stay clear. Stay unique. You are a snowflake, you don’t need validation from others, specially creeps who who judge personal lives, while evaluating a professional decision.



malinink says:

It’s not about leading multiple personalities – it’s about having to keep your entire self / personal self protected from those who use it adversely against you in professional races. Not a lot of people can afford doing whatever they want in their personal lives without having to face any consequences (no matter how fair or unfair, and mostly unfair) in their professional lives. Especially in the Pakistani corporate landscape.



There’s a lot of truth in the first comment on the blog. Why keep two separate profiles? Your “full” self includes personal and professional, both. Besides, you can “protect” your personal self via various regulations on Facebook at least.
Rather than whether employers should creep up on your personal life, a “good” employer would rather focus on what you’re saying/posting about other brands (which may or may not be your competitor).



what say you?

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

et cetera
%d bloggers like this: